Research Study About experiences of students with online classes and their expectations

Research Study About experiences of students with online classes and their expectations

Table of Contents

Page

Introduction……………………….………………..……………………………….………..3

Research theory framework…………………………………………………………………3

Methodology….…………………………………………………………………………. ….4

Results………….………………………………………………………….……………. ….6

Discussion/Conclusion.…………………………………………………….……………….7

References…..….…………………………………………………………..…………………9

Adult Students Expectations on Online Classes

Introduction

The article by Bourdeaux and Schoenack is significant in addressing the expectations of adult students and their experience through online learning. The study is about the experiences of students with online classes and their expectations. The changing times are bringing about an imminent need for online learning, which prompts a lot of students to choose this model of learning. This change is driven by technological advancements that are favoring distance and online learning. The advent of the online class has also seen more adult learners join colleges and universities due to the flexibility of the system. It allows them to work and stay with the families and, at the same time, learn. For example, Bourdeaux observes that between 1997 and 2011, an increase of 51% of 25-34 years old students in higher learning were enrolled in online learning, and about 26% of students above 35 years and above were enrolled (Bourdeaux, 2016). Research Study About experiences of students with online classes and their expectations However, it is critical that when the adult students taking online classes are not adequately supported, they tend to lose hope and abandon the learning. The article by Bourdeaux attempts to evaluate the way adults’ expectations in online learning can be met, the element of the online learning environment, and the practicality of the expectancy violations theory in online classes. The study design is qualitative as it is naturalistic such that it studies real-world events; it is emergent due to its use of new changes taking place in the education sector, and also it is purposeful targets a specific population and, in this case, adults engaged in online classes.

Research theory framework

The research theory is based on the nature of adult students, including their behavior and ability to cope with online learning expectations. In this case, adult students are defined as those above 24 years old with employments and with families. The theory suggests that adult learners are typically recognized for their issues with time management and challenging life roles when compared with traditional students (Bourdeaux, 2016). The adult students are unique in their lifestyles as family and work derail their availability for full-time classes. The expectations of adult learners are also said to be diverse and different from those of traditional students. This is because they tend to have more meaningful relationships and engagements with instructors and staff than other traditional students. Further, Bourdeaux observes that the online courses are exceedingly growing in popularity, but still, there is a challenge because the instructors have not yet perfected the models of online instruction. Ideally, this is true, considering that the completion rates of online courses were said to be less than those of traditional students (Bourdeaux, 2016) Research Study About experiences of students with online classes and their expectations.

The expectancy violations theory is expressed by Bourdeaux as the way of examining the behaviors of people during interpersonal interactions. According to this theory, during interactions, people have some expectations of some notions and which changes their behavior. Through this theory, individuals can assess and evaluate the behaviors of others concerning their closeness. Instances of violations of expectations take place when individuals’ tolerable behaviors exit range during the interaction. Mismatches also result in less satisfying behaviors, and matching behaviors enhance expectations. According to Bourdeaux, there are inherent rules about the expectations that people have during interpersonal relationships. These rules apply to both offline and online educational experiences among students and teachers (Creswell, 2018) Research Study About experiences of students with online classes and their expectations.

1. What were the critical components of the research, theory framework that supported the development of the research questions?

The research, theory elicits critical components in support of the research questions. The major components in this aspect include the rules of instructions. The adult students’ expectations of the instructions and the diverse needs of the adult students affect their online learning.

Methodology

The study involved 22 participants who responded via emails and fulfilled the yardstick for the research. Out of this number, 36.4% are females, and 63.6% were males. The participants’ ages were also critical such that the study involved those between 24-60 years. Racial backgrounds were also considered such that 68.2% were Caucasians, 18.2% were African Americans, 9.1% Asian, and 4.5% Somali. The participants were from two diverse universities, and thus their levels of education were equally assessed. For example, two of them (9.1%) were in the fifth year, five (22.7%) were sophomores, four (18.2%) were juniors, and 11 (50%) were seniors (Bourdeaux, 2016) Research Study About experiences of students with online classes and their expectations.

The interviews for the study were carried out through the one investigator one contributor in an exclusive room in the varsity, and also semi-structured protocols were adapted. The participants were required to respond to the questions, and later some follow-up questions about their completed online courses (Creswell, 2018). The major questions asked were about the reason students opted to take the online classes. The interviews took about 13 to 46 minutes, with an average of 23 minutes. The data were analyzed using open coding where data was first broken into discrete parts, examined, and compared to garner some differences (Bourdeaux, 2016). Later, independent coding was made, followed by a reliability check on all the transcripts. Axial coding was the final thing in identifying the relationships among the codes

2. In what ways did the recruitment strategies protect the privacy of the potential participants? How did they provide clear and accurate information regarding the study? How did they avoid exerting undue pressure or influence on the potential participants?

The recruitment strategies used consent from the participants by first informing them about the upcoming study. In addition, the participants were assured of the confidentiality of the entire process. The participants provided clear information as they were not coerced and were given time and open questions to respond to.

3. How were the data analyzed?

Data were analyzed through different models of coding for practical evaluation.

Results

Themes were used in evaluating the results of the study, including themes of time, learning tools, and self-directed. The theme of time shows that students were more comfortable about online classes as they were not restricted with time such that they could study anytime they want. In addition, it was discovered that students wanted an opportunity to self-direct themselves to accomplish their education courses. Learning tools were also enhanced, and it was realized that some students preferred open online tools such as discussion boards in learning. The expected behaviors, including clarity, intentional design, and respect, were also critical. Overall, positive instructor behavior was enhanced, enabling learning and effective communication. However, the result also showed that negative instructor behaviors might result from altering the learning process and reduced the use of tools (Bourdeaux, 2016) Research Study About experiences of students with online classes and their expectations.

4. Describe how and to what degree the themes of Time, Self-Directed, and Learning Tools help answer the main research questions?

The themes that answered the main questions includes time, self-directed, and learning tools. Time was seen as an essential event such that adult learners have issues of time and want online classes as they are not strict on time. In addition, self-directed learning was more plausible than traditional learning, and also the learning tools used to enhance positive learning among adult students.

Discussions/ conclusions

The research showed that adults were willing to sign up for the online classes as they fitted their schedules enabled them to apply the learning tools they want and because it allows self-direction. The study also concluded that adult learners that take online classes expect to be treated with respect and given intentional design. This is because adult students do not have much time for interaction and for studying. These aspects of clarity, intentional design, and respect are only achievable when the instructors have proven teaching abilities. The students claimed that it is less satisfying if the instructors fail to meet their expectations in terms of behavior. The limitation of the study is that it used only a small number of participants, which is difficult to general use, but it was excellently conducted. Bourdeaux and Schoenack’s recommended that instructors should invest their time in learning and making online classes adept for adult learners Research Study About experiences of students with online classes and their expectations.

5. Based on the recommendations for further research, describe how an Applied Improvement Project (AIP) could be developed to address the issue being described. What intervention might be implemented for online instructors?

An applied improvement project (AIP) can be developed through enhancing the use of better technological tools such as Zoom and video conferencing to enhance learning, adult learners should be evaluated on their prowess in using these technologies for active learning. Online classrooms should be conducted using transparent and well-articulated materials such as images, voice, and contents for active learning.

References

Bourdeaux, R., & Schoenack, L. (2016). Adult student expectations and experiences in an online learning environment. The Journal of Continuing Higher Education, 64, 152-161. doi:10.1080/07377363.2016.1229072

Creswell, J. W., & Creswell, J. D. (2018). Research design: Qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods approach (5th ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.